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Old 04-18-2008, 11:07 AM   #91
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Re: Today's Birthday...

April 18, 1929 - Theodore Wilson "Ted" Guy



Colonel Ted Guy was a USAF fighter pilot that spent 5 years as a POW in Laos & North Vietnam before becoming a tireless campaigner for the cause of service personnel MIA.

The son of a big band leader, "Ted" joined the Air Force in 1947 and served his country as an Air Force fighter pilot for the next 26 years. He served in both the Korean and Vietnam wars, flying the F-84 in the Korean theater of operations, and the F-4 in the Vietnam theater. He flew over 250 combat missions and was the recipient of the Silver Star, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal and a Purple Heart.

On March 22, 1968, while attacking an automatic weapons position near the Vietnamese/Laotian border during the battle of Khe Sanh, a bomb on his F4 failed to release properly and detonated too close to the jet, exploding the aircraft and he was involuntarily ejected over Southern Laos. He parachuted to safety and, after a firefight, was captured by NVA troops.

He was beaten and marched up the Ho Chi Minh trail, being exposed to Agent Orange along the way. He was then held in several POW camps in the Hanoi area, including the infamous Hanoi Hilton. He was brutally tortured by the North Vietnamese, to the point where he would pass out from severe beatings. His head injuries would later see him medically discharged from the service. He was also forced to spend nearly four years in solitary confinement. He became known as the "Hawk".

When he was finally removed from solitary confinement, he was put in a prison with more than a hundred other U.S. military and civilian prisoners. He became the Senior Ranking Officer among them and was responsible for maintaining order, chain of command, and the code of conduct among his fellow POWs. His leadership and guidance helped his fellow POWs survive their ordeal. Many of them referred to themselves as "Hawk's Heroes" in honor of Ted Guy.

Almost 20 years after his retirement in 1973 as a colonel, he changed his view regarding the issue of MIA's and became convinced that many American troops had been abandoned in Laos, which had not been included in the deal to release POW's with North Vietnam. He fought tirelessly with Congress to have the CIA's secret files declassified in an attempt to make sure these people were not forgotten.

In 1998, he contracted Myelodysplastic Syndrome (a variant of leukemia), probably as a result of Agent Orange exposure, and passed away at the age of 70 on April 23, 1999. He was buried at Arlington with full military honours - a hero to all who knew him.


Ted once said "Honor is something that once you lose it you become like an insect in the jungle. You prey upon others and others prey upon you until there is nothing left. Once you lose your honor, all the gold in the world is useless in your attempt to regain it."
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Old 01-26-2009, 08:45 AM   #92
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Time to resurrect this thread.

Emil pondered whether I could keep this thread running for a year - and indeed I planned to before the forums were afflicted with such a bad dose of puberty blues last year that I needed a break. Perhaps I will fill in some gaps this year.

January 26, 1892 - Bessie Coleman


Bessie Coleman was the first black woman to gain a pilots license.


Born the 10th of 13 children, Bessie Coleman was a keen student and excelled at school but was deprived of opportunity to complete a university degree because of lack of money. She left Texas to join her brothers in Chicago in 1915. There, she was entranced by the stories of pilots returning from the war in Europe and dreamed of becoming a pilot herself. Being black and a woman, no-one would teach her, even though she had financial backing from the editor of the Chicago Defender paper. She learnt French and in 1921 travelled to France where she earned the first international pilots license to be held by a black woman.

Despite some early hurdles, she went on to become an inspirational Barnstormer, with the sobriquet "Queen Bess". Coleman yearned to open a flight school for black pilots. She believed "the air is the only place free from prejudices." She turned her accomplishments into celebrity, appearing on newsreels, performing at air shows, and lecturing to encourage other blacks to pursue aviation careers.

By 1926, Coleman had raised almost enough money to open her school. As fate would have it, her dreams never came true. She died in a crash at a Florida air show in 1926. She was killed when she was thrown from her plane when it lost control during a practice run in Jacksonville Florida on April 30, 1926 - aged just 34.

After her death, Bessie's achievements have become more celebrated as a pioneer of African American achievement. She is buried at Lincoln Cemetery and a road is named for her at O'Hare International Airport. She was honored on a postage stamp in 1995 and was inducted into the Aviation Hall of Fame. Bessie Coleman Aero Clubs were established by William J Powell in 1929 to help blacks become pilots in the USA.
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Old 01-26-2009, 03:07 PM   #93
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingdoc View Post
Time to resurrect this thread.

Emil pondered whether I could keep this thread running for a year - and indeed I planned to before the forums were afflicted with such a bad dose of puberty blues last year that I needed a break. Perhaps I will fill in some gaps this year.

January 26, 1892 - Bessie Coleman


Bessie Coleman was the first black woman to gain a pilots license.


Born the 10th of 13 children, Bessie Coleman was a keen student and excelled at school but was deprived of opportunity to complete a university degree because of lack of money. She left Texas to join her brothers in Chicago in 1915. There, she was entranced by the stories of pilots returning from the war in Europe and dreamed of becoming a pilot herself. Being black and a woman, no-one would teach her, even though she had financial backing from the editor of the Chicago Defender paper. She learnt French and in 1921 travelled to France where she earned the first international pilots license to be held by a black woman.

Despite some early hurdles, she went on to become an inspirational Barnstormer, with the sobriquet "Queen Bess". Coleman yearned to open a flight school for black pilots. She believed "the air is the only place free from prejudices." She turned her accomplishments into celebrity, appearing on newsreels, performing at air shows, and lecturing to encourage other blacks to pursue aviation careers.

By 1926, Coleman had raised almost enough money to open her school. As fate would have it, her dreams never came true. She died in a crash at a Florida air show in 1926. She was killed when she was thrown from her plane when it lost control during a practice run in Jacksonville Florida on April 30, 1926 - aged just 34.

After her death, Bessie's achievements have become more celebrated as a pioneer of African American achievement. She is buried at Lincoln Cemetery and a road is named for her at O'Hare International Airport. She was honored on a postage stamp in 1995 and was inducted into the Aviation Hall of Fame. Bessie Coleman Aero Clubs were established by William J Powell in 1929 to help blacks become pilots in the USA.
So that's Bessie Coleman. I used to drive on Bessie Coleman Drive all the time and never knew who she was!



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Old 01-29-2009, 05:16 AM   #94
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Re: Today's Birthday...

January 27, 1920 - Hiroyoshi Nishizawa

Japan's "Ace of Aces".

Hiroyoshi Nishizawa was born the 5th son of a saké brewery manager. He was quiet and retiring until he was transformed in the cockpit of his A6M Zero, where he had supreme confidence and daring. His comrades felt that whilst he was at the controls, he was invincible - and that proved to be the case.

One of his closest friends said of him: "To all who flew with him, he became 'the Devil'....Never have I seen a man with a fighter plane do what Nishizawa would do with his Zero. His aerobatics were all at once breathtaking, brilliant, totally unpredictable, impossible, and heart-stirring to witness." He also had the hunter's eye, capable of spotting enemy aircraft before his comrades knew there was anything else in the sky.

He made his reputation flying with Tainan Ku out of Lae in New Guinea. He, Toshio Ota and Saburo Sakai became the veterans of the group, known as the clean-up trio for their large number of aerial victories. The Japanese did not encourage or officially log personal victories, and official tolls were probably wildly inflated. Nishizawa's first victory was over a RAAF Catalina that limped home to Moresby on one engine on Feb 3rd, 1942. By his own reckoning he finished with 87 victories, although some authors credit him with over 100.

In a memorable episode of the war in New Guinea, and on Nishizwa's instigation, he, Ota and Sakai put on a display of aerobatics right over the Allied airfield at Port Moresby on their way home from a mission!!!

Eventually, superiority of numbers saw the balance of air power shift in the Pacific theatre and many of Nishizawa's experienced colleagues perished. The Admiralty brought him back to Japan to train other pilots but he was miserable and his performance in the role was barely adequate. On October 22, 1944 he was put in charge of the fighter escort of the very first Kamikazé mission in which 5 stripped-down Zeroes carrying 550 pound bombs were aimed into American warships in a deliberate suicide. During that mission he had a premonition of his own death, despite his previous feeling of invulnerability and belief that he could not be shot down in aerial combat. He requested to pilot a Kamikazé plane the following day but was refused, such was his worth as a pilot. Instead, he was despatched with some others to collect a new batch of fighters but the transport he was in was shot down. He died as a passenger and not a pilot.
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Old 01-29-2009, 05:53 AM   #95
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Re: Today's Birthday...

January 28, 1884 - Auguste Antoine Piccard

Piccard made possible modern aviation and space exploration by inventing the Pressurized Cabin and The Stratospheric Balloon.


Auguste Antoine Piccard (January 28, 1884 – March 24, 1962) was a Swiss physicist, inventor and explorer. Piccard and his twin brother Jean Felix were born in Basel, Switzerland. Showing an intense interest in science as a child, he attended the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, and became a professor of physics in Brussels. A friend of both Albert Einstein and Marie Curie, he was famous for spectacular inventions but he was also a scientist of universal scope. His thesis in physics concerned the magnetization of water. He identified Uranium 235, which he called "Actinuran." An experiment he conducted in a balloon, proved part of Einstein's Theory of Relativity which had been called into question. He constructed the most precise scales, galvanometers and seismographs of his era.

In addition to his achievements as a scientist, he was also an aviator and an explorer. In 1930, an interest in ballooning, and a curiosity about the upper atmosphere led him to design a spherical, pressurized aluminum gondola that would allow ascent to great altitude without requiring a pressure suit. He made the first ascents into the stratosphere in 1931 and 1932, reaching heights of 15,781 metres and 16,201 metres respectively, to study cosmic rays. He set new altitude records that eclipsed all others by over 10,000 feet and became the first man to witness the curvature of the Earth with his own eyes.

Applying the principle of his stratospheric balloon to the exploration of the deepest oceans, he built a revolutionary submarine, which he named the Bathyscaphe. Begun in 1937, but interrupted by the war, he an his son, Jacques were to dive to 3150 metres in 1953; he became the man of both extremes, having flown the highest and dived the deepest. His exploits were the stuff of legend - before him this was the realm of Jules Verne novels.

Auguste Piccard was part of an extraordinary family. His twin brother, Jean, emigrated to the United States to become a chemistry professor, and with his wife Jeanette made another ascent into the stratosphere. Jean's son, Donald, continued the aeronautic tradition by pioneering the revival of hot-air ballooning in the 1960s. Auguste's own son, Jacques, set a depth record in the Mariana trench and in 1999 his grandson, Bertrand, was the first man to fly non-stop the Earth in a balloon.
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Old 01-29-2009, 07:16 AM   #96
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Re: Today's Birthday...

29 January, 1924 - Brian Trubshaw


Brian Trubshaw, MVO, CBE, OBE capped his career as a leading British test pilot by making the maiden flight of the first British-built Concorde on 9 April, 1969.


Ernest Brian Trubshaw was born in 1924 in Llanelli and educated at Winchester College. He was bitten by the flying bug at the age of 10, when, as a prelude to the Prince of Wales's opening of the Royal Welsh Agricultural Show, the prince's personal aeroplane landed on the beach at Pembrey, Carmarthenshire. Little did the excited young Trubshaw know that he was destined to serve under its pilot, Flt Lt E.H. "Mouse" Fielden, on the King's Flight of the RAF in years to come. He signed up for the RAF at the age of eighteen in 1942 at Lords cricket ground and went to the United States where he trained as a pilot flying Stearman biplanes in Arizona. He joined Bomber Command in 1944, flying Stirlings and Lancasters, transferring a year later to Transport Command.

After the War he joined the King's Flight, piloting George VI and other members of the Royal Family. Then in 1949-50 he taught at the Empire Flying School and the RAF Flying College.

Flight Lieutenant Trubshaw was given permission to leave the RAF in 1950 to take up a role as test pilot for Vickers Armstrong, where he remained for 30 years; he became chief test pilot in 1960, and director of test flights from 1966. Trubshaw did much test-flying of the first of Britain's three V-bombers, the Vickers Valiant. He also helped develop the Vanguard, the Viscount, the VC10, and the BAC One-Eleven, all of which he test flew. He tested the UK's first atomic bomb before taking up his role with the Concorde project.

(On one occasion a dummy atom bomb, identical in size and weight to the real thing, was to be dropped on a range, but came loose shortly after take-off, when the bomber was over Dorking. Fortunately the bomb door locks were strong enough to retain the bomb until the aircraft was over the Thames Estuary, where it was dropped!)

He shot to public attention when he first flew Concorde on 9 April 1969 on a flight from Filton to its test base at RAF Fairford. He emerged from Concorde 002's then futuristic cockpit with the words: "It was wizard - a cool, calm and collected operation." Weeks earlier he had piloted an early test flight of the identical French prototype Concorde, 001, commanded by André Turcat. Trubshaw and Turcat were both awarded the prestigious Ivan C. Kincheloe Award in 1971, for their work on Concorde. Speaking later about his time at the controls of Concorde he said: "Many test pilots would have given almost anything to be in my shoes and I well appreciated how lucky I was."

Among numerous honours, he was appointed a Member of Royal Victorian Order in 1948. He was awarded the OBE in 1964 and the CBE in 1970 and was awarded the French Aeronautical Medal in 1976. He ended his career as divisional director and general manager of the Filton works of British Aerospace from 1980-1986. From 1986-1993 he was a member of the board of the Civil Aviation Authority, and worked as an aviation consultant.

Trubshaw was also an author, writing several books on aviation, notably Concorde: The Inside Story (which was launched the day after the Paris crash).

Trubshaw never flew as a hobby, expressing no desire to fly in small aeroplanes. He much preferred gardening at his home in Tetbury, Gloucestershire where he died peacefully in his sleep in 2001, aged 77.
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Old 01-30-2009, 06:42 PM   #97
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Re: Today's Birthday...


January 30, 1891 - Walter Herschell Beech



Walter Beech was one of America's finest aircraft designers and industrialists.

Born on a farm in Tennessee on January 30, 1891, Beech's made his first attempted flight at age 14 when he built a glider of his own design using materials he found around his own home. His mother's pride in his accomplishment probably waned with the discovery that a portion of those materials had been her new bedsheets. Although that particular aeronautical experiment was a failure, young Walter was not defeated. Ten years later, on July 11, 1914, he made his first solo flight in a Curtiss biplane he and a friend rebuilt.

In 1917, Beech enlisted in the Army Air Corps. He served for three years as a pilot, flight instructor and engineer. Following the war, he toured the U.S. as a barnstormer for 3 years gathering ideas for improvements in aircraft design and construction. The tour was perilous financially and in every other respect, but it vastly enriched Beech's aeronautical knowledge and experience.

In 1921 Beech came to Wichita, Kansas to work as a test pliot for the E. M. Laird Company, producer of the Laird Swallow, a three-place, tandem, open-cockpit biplane. In attempting to demonstrate the reliability of the company's product and thereby increase sales, Beech won numerous air races. In less than two years, he was made general manager of the company.

Eager to obtain the freedom to put his knowledge and ideas about aircraft design to practice, he resigned in 1924 to open the Travel Air Manufacturing Company with Clyde Cessna. Beech's Travel Air Special biplane was perfection in the air, and with it he became one of the co-winners of the 1925 Ford Reliability Tour. The following year, he and navigator Brice Goldsborough won the 1926 Ford Reliability Tour, during which they demonstrated the practicability of "blind flight" in their instrumented Travel Air. Within four years of its opening, Travel Air became the world's largest producer of commercial monoplane and biplane aircraft.

Just when it looked like the aviation industry was firmly established in Wichita, the stock market crash of 1929 forced the industry into hard times. Faced with dwindling sales, Beech merged Travel Air with the Curtiss-Wright Airplane Company. By the end of 1931 he was president of Curtiss-Wright and was spending most of his time in New York, away from the production plant in St. Louis. Because he desired more input into the design of his aircraft, he resigned from Curtiss-Wright and founded his own company.

He and his wife, Olive returned to Wichita in April 1932 to found the Beech Aircraft Company at the height of the Great Depression. The company's first objective was to build a five-seat biplane having the interior luxury of a fine sedan, a top speed of 200 m.p.h., a landing speed no higher than 60 m.p.h., a non-stop range of 1, 000 miles, easy controllability, and sound aerodynamic characteristics. The "experts" saw all of these specifications as unattainable. On November 14, 1932, Model 17R made its initial test flight and the impossible standards set by Beech had been met.

In 1934, the Model 17 Staggerwing Biplane went into commercial production. It was years ahead of its time, able to match the fastest military plane of the day for speed, and soon Staggerwings were breaking records all over the world. Farquhar and Beiler flew their Staggerwing around the world. Then Bill Ong took the Frank Phillips Trophy in his, while Louise Thaden set a women's speed record in hers. Later, she and Blanche Noyes won the 1936 Bendix Trophy Race. Jackie Cochran used her Staggerwing to set a new women's speed record, finishing third in the 1937 Bendix, and setting an altitude record of over 30,000 feet.

The major innovation of the B17L was a negative staggered wing design, which improved controllability at all speeds, provided high visibility for pilots, and quick ground servicing. It also had retractable landing gear, which reduced wind resistance and made emergency belly landings an added safety feature. A testimony to the high standards of the aircraft that Beech created is that many well-kept B17L biplanes are still flying today.

During World War II, Beech turned the entire production of his company to defense, producing more than 7,400 military aircraft. The famed twin Beech AT-71C-45 trained more than 90 percent of the U.S. Army Air Forces navigator/bombardier's and 50 percent of the multi-engine pilots.

In the postwar years Walter Beech again applied his design genius to producing a new line of light aircraft, the most famous of which was the "V" tailed Bonanza. Today, Beech Aircraft Company (now Raytheon Aviation) remains a leader in the design, development and production of personal, corporate and military aircraft, as well as in space research.

Walter Beech suffered a fatal heart attack on 1950. He was invested into the International Aerospace Hall of Fame in 1982.
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Old 01-30-2009, 07:42 PM   #98
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Re: Today's Birthday...

I'll have to email you my picture and stats for my big day.



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Old 01-30-2009, 07:50 PM   #99
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Re: Today's Birthday...

thanks flyingdoc you made a great thread!

Some good reading in there
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Old 01-30-2009, 09:05 PM   #100
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Wahoo View Post
I'll have to email you my picture and stats for my big day.
I got you covered Big Guy - stay tuned...
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Old 01-30-2009, 09:43 PM   #101
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Re: Today's Birthday...

January 31, 1769 - André-Jacques Garnerin

André-Jacques Garnerin was the inventor of the frameless parachute and the first person to use a parachute regularly and successfully.


Garnerin was born in Paris studied physics before joining the French Army. Over the next few years Garnerin became interested in hot air balloons and advocated their use for military purposes.

He was captured by British troops during the first phase of the Napoleonic Wars 1792 - 1797, turned over to the Austrians and held a prisoner in Buda in Hungary for three years. While in prison, another inmate dreamed of surprising the "vigilance of sentries" and overcoming "walls 10 feet thick" by jumping "from the ramparts without being injured." Garnerin did not escape but he did design, test and demonstrate the first frameless parachute.

It was not until 1797 that Garnerin completed his first parachute. It consisted of a white canvas canopy 23 feet in diameter. The parachute had 36 ribs and lines, was semi-rigid, making it look like a very large umbrella.

At age 28 Garnerin made his first successful parachute jump above over Parc Monceau, Paris on 22nd October, 1797. After ascending to an altitude of 3,200 feet (975 m) in an hydrogen balloon he jumped from the basket. The descent was a success, except that he he oscillated wildly in his fall. The physicist Lalande, who attended the event, suggested improving air flow by adding a small vent at the top of the canopy.

He landed without injury in front of an admiring crowd. Garnerin made exhibition jumps all over Europe including one of 8,000 feet (2,438 m) in England. On October 3-4 1803, he covered a distance of 245 miles (395 km) between Paris and Clausen with his balloon. He eventually completed about 200 jumps.

Garnerin died aged 41. While preparing balloon equipment, a beam struck his head inflicting a mortal wound.



31 January, 1785 - Charles Green

English balloonist who set a long-distance balloon record that lasted 71 years.


Charles Green, born in London, was the United Kingdom's most famous balloonist of the 19th century. He experimented with coal gas as a cheaper and more readily available alternative to hydrogen for lifting power. His first ascent was in a coal gas balloon on July 19, 1821. He became a professional balloonist and had made 200 ascents by 1835. In 1836, he set a major long distance record in the balloon "Royal Vauxhall", flying overnight from Vauxhall Gardens in London to Weilburg, Duchy of Nassau (Germany) a distance of 480 miles (770 km): this record was not broken until 1907. By the time he retired in 1852, he had flown in a balloon more than 500 times.

Green was the first to demonstrate, in 1821, that coal-gas was applicable to the inflation of balloons. Before his time pure hydrogen gas was used, a substance very expensive, the generation of which was so slow that two days were required to fill a large balloon, and then the gas was excessively volatile. He was also the inventor of the trail rope, which could be lowered or raised by means of a windlass and used as an aid to steering and landing a balloon.

He planned, but never attempted, an Atlantic crossing. The small working model of his proposed balloon, flown in 1840, incorporated the first mechanically driven propeller ever to power an aircraft. After living in retirement for many years he died suddenly of heart disease at his London home on 26 March 1870.

A trophy named after him, the "Charles Green Salver", is awarded by the British Balloon and Airship Club (BBAC) for exceptional flying achievements or contributions in ballooning. Recipients have included Brian Jones and Bertrand Piccard for the first round-the-world balloon flight.
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Old 02-01-2009, 04:58 AM   #102
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Well, today it's the big one! The climax that this thread has been heading for since its inception 12 months ago.

Today we remember the birthday of one of the greatest names in aviation history - a man who has inspired all that visit these forums. As Kaptain Kardar put it... " da bomb...The Man, the Myth, the Legend..."








February 1, 1964 - Captain Wahoo


Known lovingly as Brian by his mother, but never a very naughty boy, Captain Wahoo came into the world on February 1, 1964 - the day before GI Joe made his first appearance! It was also the day that the Beatles had their first #1 hit on the American charts with "I want to hold your hand" - a place it held for 7 weeks. When news of Wahoos birth made it across the pond, the US Ice Hockey team celebrated by beating Switzerland at the 9th Winter Olympics in Innsbrück.


Wahoo's desire to fly was sparked at a very early age when an overflying goose named Herman dropped his load on the toddlers head whilst playing in his sandpit. He built his first airplane from empty egg cartons, chewing gum, a pair of his mothers panty-hose and assorted spare parts from O'Hare. Sadly, the impressive first attempt lacked wings and never flew.


Undeterred, Wahoo saved and bought a ticket to Dayton Ohio where he worked for the Wright brothers before homesickness for ice hockey saw him move to Chicago. Flying lessons were expensive and he spent his days pumping avgas for Monarch and his nights hanging around bars listening to the flying tales of the old timers. It seemed that no matter how much he saved, it would all be gone - frittered away on 63rd Street sliders.


Eventually he got his ratings and the legend of Wahoo was born. Despite some early mishaps, Wahoo became legendary for his flying skills and knowledge of all things aviation. Upon the repeated requests of his brethren flyers he was to establish the now-famous Wahoo Pilot's Quiz.


Word of his exceptional talent soon escaped beyond the FAA and the airlines beat a path to his door, desperate to secure the services of this urban myth. He turned down the likes of Pan American, Southern, Republic and Britt Airways to accept the offer of Larry Simmons who was snapping up all the gun pilots for his new airline. The legend grew - hell, yes - he could even fly with his eyes shut!


Before long his fame had spread to the point where he could work freelance - there was no plane he could not fly, whether it be the Cessna for CSA, the Shorts 360 or the ATR with American Eagle. Controllers around the Union were in awe whenever Wahoo's clever quips came across the radio.



Eventually, Captain Wahoo was selected as lead test pilot in the Simmons A380 project - which would later be sold to EADS.


Wahoo would later become infamous for staging the longest-ever running barbeque in his backyard on Lake Superior. It never really started and it never really ended!


Tragically, Captain Wahoo went missing whilst in command of United Flight 412 enroute from Washington Reagan to Chicago O'Hare somewhere in the vicinity of Cleveland. Air safety investigators are still trying to piece together what happened, but the last radio communications were quite garbled.


Wherever you are Captain Wahoo, I hope you have a really excellent birthday mate!
[/QUOTE]

Captain Wahoo is one of my best friends - I am trying to deal with it.
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Old 02-01-2009, 07:59 AM   #103
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Doc, you have peaked, a great dedication to The Man

Cap-we drink to your coffin. May it be built from the wood of a hundred year old oak tree that I shall plant tomorrow.
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Old 02-01-2009, 06:15 PM   #104
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Doc, that was absolutely hilarious.

Happy Birthday Cap!
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Old 02-01-2009, 06:25 PM   #105
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Re: Today's Birthday...

Bonza, mate. That was Ace!!

Happy Birthday Mr Sir Captain Wahoo, Sir.
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