Today's Birthday... - Page 5 - Wings900 Discussion Forums Wings900 - Model News

Go Back   Wings900 Discussion Forums > Wings900 Ground Control > General Squawk Talk

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Old 03-21-2008, 02:06 AM   #61
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 21, 1877 - Maurice Farman



Maurice Alain Farman (March 21, 1877 - February 25, 1964) was a French Grand Prix motor racing champion, an aviator, and an aircraft manufacturer and designer. Born in Paris to English parents, he and his brothers Richard and Henri Farman were important pioneers developers of aviation in Europe.

A champion tandem cyclist with brother Henri, Maurice Farman began racing Panhard automobiles and won the 1901 Grand Prix de Pau, the first race ever to be called a Grand Prix. In May of 1902 he won the "Circuit du Nord" race from Paris to Arras and back. He also competed in that year's Paris to Vienna race won by Marcel Renault. However, Farman's interest quickly turned to powered flight.

With his brother Henri, he had modified a Voisin pusher biplane that won them the Prize for the first flight around a 1 mile circuit, and in 1909 set both world speed and endurance records. Maurice Farman began to manufacture aircraft and in 1912 the brothers merged their interests in the Farman Aviation Works at Boulogne-sur-Seine, making many planes of their characteristic pusher biplane type for military and training purposes.

The 1914 model was extensively used for artillery observation and reconnaissance in World War I. The Farman Goliath was the first long-distance passenger airliner, beginning regular Paris-London flights on February 8, 1919. The company was wound up in 1937 when the French aviation industry was nationalized.

Maurice Farman died in Paris in 1964. To the end of his life Maurice never obtained a pilot's license.




March 21, 1913 - Heinz "Pritzl" Bär



Heinz Bär was one of the greatest Luftwaffe fighter aces. He had a total of 221 victories, and was himself shot down 18 times during the course of about 1000 combat missions.

Oskar-Heinrich Bär, known as Heinz or his nickname, "Pritzl" after his favorite candy bar, was born near Leipzig and started gliding at age 16. He became a pilot for Lufthansa, before joining the Luftwaffe and becoming a transport aircraft pilot in 1937, mostly flying the Junkers Ju-52/3m. He transferred to fighters and began the war as a corporal, flying Bf109's. He quickly proved his skill, opening his account on September 25 and accumulating 17 kills by the end of the Battle of Britain. In 1941 he was transferred to the Eastern Front where his tally rose quickly and he was swiftly promoted as an officer and decorated. By February, 1942 he had oak leaves and swords to his knights cross with 90 kills.

In the spring of 1942, Bär was to face significant new challenges - - the heavy air battles in the southern part of the Russo-German Front, the Kerch Peninsula area. He took command of I./JG77 where he had an intense rivalry with his predecessor, Gordon Gollob. There was a stark contrast and animosity between the two; Gollob was a strict disciplinarian and pro- Nazi, whereas Bär shunned authority and rules, which impacted heavily on his career. Bär beat Gollob to the target of 100 victories by the end of May.

In June JG 77 was moved to the Mediterranean area, operating first in the air battles over Malta and later in Tunisia. After achieving his 149 aerial victory General Hans-Jürgen von Arnim submitted Bär for the Diamonds to the Knight's Cross for the first time. Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring ignored this request and denied Bär the Diamonds. The reason for this remains uncertain but it is believed that Göring disliked Bär for his insubordinate character, perhaps also his lower class background and low-Saxon accent. Perhaps he recalled Bär's cheeky reply some years earlier when the Rieschmarshall was informed that Bär recently had survived being shot down in the English Channel. When Göring asked if it had been a tough experience, Bär replied: "No, sir, I kept reminding myself that Herr Reichsmarschall had said that the English Channel no longer is a channel!"

In Tunisia Bär increased his tally to 179 but seemed to lose his fighting spirit. Details are hard to find but it seems that there were times that he refused to fly, whether due to his unmilitaristic nature or simply mental and physical exhaustion. After 199 victories, Göring had him demoted and transferred to France in 1943 for "cowardice before the enemy" - sent to "rehabilitation", commanding an OTU. By 1944, he was flying combat again in FW190s and his score rose to 203. In 1945 he transferred to the Me 232 and joined Galland's JV44 which he took over after Galland was wounded.

He had 16 victories in the Me262, making him the 2nd most successful jet ace of the war. His total of 221 made him the 8th best ace of all time, including a total of 124 Western Allied aircraft, second only to Hpt. Hans-Joachim Marseille with 158 claims. He flew over 1000 sorties over the entire war and in every theatre - the best Jagdflieger ever in the opinion of many.

In achieving those victories, Bär was very fortunate, having been shot down 18 times himself and wounded many times more! He insisted on having his aircraft painted with his "lucky 13", regardless of his position within a respective unit.

After the war Bär did various work as an aviation consultant, but his luck left him on 28 April, 1957 when he was killed, performing aerobatics in a light plane LF-1 Zaunkönig over Braunschweig at age 44. It was the anniversary of his 200th victory.
__________________



Last edited by flyingdoc; 03-21-2008 at 09:53 AM.
flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-22-2008, 10:36 AM   #62
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 22, 1913 - Sabiha Gökçen



Sabiha Gökçen was the first Turkish female aviator and the first female combat pilot in the world.


Sabiha Gökçen was one of Ataturk's adopted daughters. Atatürk attached great importance to aviation and for that purpose, oversaw the foundation of the Turkish Aeronautical Association in 1925. He took Sabiha along with him to the opening ceremony of Türkkuşu Flight School on May 5, 1935. During the airshow of gliders and parachutists invited from foreign countries, she got very excited. As Atatürk asked her whether she would also want to become a skydiver, she nodded "yes indeed, I am ready right now". Atatürk instructed Fuat Bulca, the head of the school, to enroll her as the first female trainee. She should have become a skydiver, however she was much more interested in flying an airplane. So, she learned flying and received her pilot licence.

Gökçen was sent to Russia, together with seven male students, for an advanced training in gliding and fixed-wing aircraft piloting. In the beginning of 1936, Atatürk urged her to attend the Air Force Academy to become the first female military pilot of Turkey. She improved her skills by flying bomber and fighter planes at the 1st Aircraft Regiment in Eskişehir Airbase and took part in military exercises in the Aegean and Thrace in 1937 as well as the Dersim operation that same year and became the world's first female Air Force combat pilot.

In 1938, she carried out a five-day flight around the Balkan countries to great acclaim. Later, she was appointed chief trainer of the Türkkuşu Flight School of Turkish Aeronautical Association where she served until 1955 and became a member of the association's executive board.

Throughout her career in the Turkish Air Force, Gökçen flew 22 different types of aircraft for more than 8000 hours, 32 hours of which were active combat and bombardment missions. She was selected as the only female pilot for the poster of "The 20 Greatest Aviators in History" published by the United States Air Force in 1996.

She died March 23, 2001 and as her legacy, Istanbul's main international airport is named for her.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 08:31 AM   #63
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Sorry for the break on Easter Sunday - here is yesterday's post...


March 23, 1902 - Leslie Everett Baynes



L.E. Baynes was a self-educated English aeronautical engineer and innovator.

Les Baynes may be regarded as a real-life "Q", responsible for many innovative designs, a great deal of them classified! AT the age of 17 he had patented the first automatic variable pitch propeller and in his early 20's was at work for Short Brothers where he designed the Singapore Flying Boat. By the end of the 20's he was building the first all-British glider - the Scud. It's successor, the Scud 2, set a new altitude record in 1935 and the Scud 3 was the first sailplane with a retractable motor!

In 1938 he designed and patented the first V/TOL swivel turbine "Heliplane" - forerunner of today's V-22 Osprey. During WWII he designed the Baynes Bat - an enormous flying wing intended to transport tanks - the plan was later scrapped but the prototype Bat made many flights in 1943. (The "Bat" was last seen in 1958, dumped behind a hangar at Croydon.) He also designed many conversions of standard bombers for specialized uses.

After the war he was busy designing for the MOD, including high-lift research aircraft, variable sweep winged fighter aircraft (patented in 1949!) for supersonic flight and a high-speed hydrofoil seacraft! Later he went on to design commercial airliner interiors and equipment for major aircraft companies.

He died on 13 March, 1989.



March 23, 1912 - Wernher von Braun



Wernher von Braun was the worlds most renowned rocket developer who produced the Nazi V-2 rockets in WWII before heading up the USA's rocket program - initially working in ICBM's and then with NASA.


The son of a Prussian baron, Wernher Magnus Maximilian von Braun became enamored with the possibilities of space exploration as a youth by reading the science fiction of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, and the 1923 science fact classic of Hermann Oberth, "By Rocket to Space", prompting young von Braun to master calculus and trigonometry so he could understand the physics of rocketry. From his teenage years, von Braun had held a keen interest in space flight, becoming involved in the German rocket society as early as 1929. He was recruited in 1932 to work for the German army to develop ballistic missiles. While engaged in this work, on 27 July 1934, von Braun received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Berlin.

Von Braun developed the V-2 ballistic missile for the Nazis during World War II at a secret laboratory at Peenemünde on the Baltic coast. (Himmler took control of the station and von Braun himself was an SS officer - although he was arrested at one stage by the Gestapo amid concerns he was more interested in space travel than missile development). The V-2 rocket was the immediate antecedent of those used in space exploration programs in the United States and the Soviet Union. A liquid propellant missile extending some 46 feet in length and weighing 27,000 pounds, the V-2 flew was capable of supersonic speed and could fly at an altitude of over 50 miles to deliver a one ton warhead to a target 500 miles away. As a result it could not be effectively stopped once launched. First flown in October 1942, it was employed against targets in Europe beginning in September 1944.

By the beginning of 1945, it was obvious to von Braun that Germany would not achieve victory against the Allies, and he began planning for the postwar era. Before the Allied capture of the V-2 rocket complex, von Braun engineered the surrender of 500 of his top rocket scientists, along with plans and test vehicles, to the Americans.

For fifteen years after World War II, von Braun would work with the United States army in the development of ballistic missiles. As part of a military operation called Project Paperclip, he and his "rocket team" were scooped up from defeated Germany and sent to America where they were installed at first at Fort Bliss, Texas, and later in New Mexico and Alabama. Von Braun became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1955.

After the Soviet Union successfully launched Sputnik in 1957, Braun concentrated on the development of space rockets and in January, 1958 launched Explorer I. In 1960, his rocket development center transferred from the army to the newly established NASA and received a mandate to build the giant Saturn rockets. Accordingly, von Braun became director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the chief architect of the Saturn V launch vehicle, the superbooster that would propel Americans to the Moon.

Von Braun also became one of the most prominent spokesmen of space exploration in the United States during the 1950s. In 1970, NASA leadership asked von Braun to move to Washington, DC, to head up the strategic planning effort for the agency. When Nixon slashed the Apollo budget two years later he retired from NASA and went to work at Fairchild Industries. He died in Alexandria, Virginia after a battle with cancer on 16 June 1977.
__________________



Last edited by flyingdoc; 03-24-2008 at 10:18 AM.
flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 03-24-2008, 09:11 AM   #64
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 24, 1910 - "Sailor" Malan



Adolph Gysbert Malan DSO & Bar, DFC, known as Sailor Malan, was South Africa's 2nd highest ace and a famed World War II RAF fighter pilot who led No. 74 Squadron RAF during the height of the Battle of Britain.

Known always as John to his wife and best friends, Malan was born in South Africa and served in the mercantile marine before traveling to the UK and learning to fly in the '30s. He was forever after known in the RAF as "Sailor". In 1935 the RAF started the rapid expansion of its pilot corps, and Malan was one of the people who joined up. He completed training and was sent to join 74 Squadron on December 20, 1936. It was his first and only squadron. He was promoted to Pilot Officer in January 1937, and showed his leadership as acting Flight Commander of "A" Flight, flying Spitfires. He received another promotion to Flight Lieutenant just before the opening of the war.

The 74 "Tiger" Squadron was involved in action only 15 hours after war was declared and during the evacuation of Dunkirk on June 28, 1940, Sailor was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross having achieved 5 'kill' claims. By August, Malan was given command of 74 Squadron and promoted to Acting Squadron Leader. This was at the height of the Battle of Britain. He finished his active fighter career in 1941 with 27 kills destroyed, 7 shared destroyed and 2 unconfirmed, 3 probables and 16 damaged, at the time the RAF's leading ace.

Malan was promoted to Group Captain in 1941 and became Station Commander at Biggin Hill. Malan remained keen to fly on operations, often ignoring standing orders for Station Commanders not to risk getting shot down. In October 1943 he became OC 19 Fighter Wing, 2nd TAF, then commander of the 145 (Free French) Fighter Wing in time for D-day, leading a section of the wing over the beaches during the late afternoon.

He published a set of rules for aerial combat that were widely circulated throughout the RAF. Among them...

"INITIATIVE, AGGRESSION, AIR DISCIPLINE, and TEAM WORK are words that MEAN something in Air Fighting."

In 1946 Malan left the RAF and returned to South Africa. In the 1950s he formed a protest group of ex-servicemen called the Torch Commando to fight the National Party's plans to remove Cape's "coloured" voters from the roll. The Torch Commando fought a battle for more than five years, and at its height had 250,000 members. The government was so alarmed by the number of judges, public servants and military officers joining the organisation that a new law was passed to ban anyone in public service or the military from joining. Eventually, Apartheid was created, despite the protests of men and women who, like Malan, valued the freedoms and principles they fought for in WWII.

He died in Kimberley in 1963 of Parkinson's Disease. A request to the South African Government that he be accorded a military funeral was turned down. The SAAF also did not pay him any tribute. Across the pond in the UK, Malan is fondly remembered as the embodiment of RAF 74 Sqn.
__________________



Last edited by flyingdoc; 03-24-2008 at 10:25 AM.
flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2008, 12:22 PM   #65
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 25, 1915 - Anton "Toni" Hackl



Anton "Toni" Hackl was a former Luftwaffe fighter ace, a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords, and one of the very few who served and survived the whole of WWII.


Hackl joined the Luftwaffe in 1936 and served in Norway during the early part of WWII where he scoed his first victories. In July, 1941 he was posted to the Eastern Front where, like many other Luftwaffe pilots he amassed many victories against the Soviets.

By May 1942 he had 51 victories and was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight's Cross). In August, he recorded his 100th victory. After his 118th victory he was transferred to Tunisia where Hackl claimed 6 victories. In combat with P-38 Lightnings on 4 February 1943 he was badly wounded and was hospitalised for several months, returning to duties in Germany in September 1943. He continued to score victories and promotions, finishing the war as Kommodore with 192 official kills in approx. 1000 missions, but another 24 unconfirmed; 131 victories were claimed while serving on the Eastern Front, 6 victories have been claimed in Africa and 55 on the Western Front. He had the 2nd highest tally of daylight bomber kills. He was shot down 8 times and wounded 4 times.

Toni Hackl died on 9 July 1984 in his hometown, Regensburg.



March 25, 1928 - James A. Lovell, Jr.



James "Jim" Arthur Lovell, Jr., is a former NASA astronaut, most famous as the commander of Apollo 13, which suffered an explosion enroute to the Moon but was brought back safely to Earth by the efforts of the crew and mission control.

Prior to being selected in 1962 for NASA's space program, Jim Lovell was a Naval Aviator. He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1952 and served in Korea before becoming a test pilot at the Naval Air Test Center in Maryland, flying F-4 Phantoms. He has logged more than 7,000 hours flying time--more than 3,500 hours in jet aircraft.

He and Frank Borman were launched into space on the history-making Gemini 7 mission in 1965. The flight lasted 330 hours and 35 minutes and included the first rendezvous of two manned maneuverable spacecraft. He also flew the last Gemini Mission (12) before serving as the Command Module pilot in Apollo 8 in the first circumnavigation of the moon in 1968. He and the other crew were hte first to leave the Earth's gravitational influence!

He completed his fourth mission as Spacecraft Commander of the Apollo 13 flight, April 11-17, 1970, and became the first man to journey twice to the moon. Apollo 13 was programmed for ten days. However, the original flight plan was modified en route to the moon due to a failure of the Service Module cryogenic oxygen system. Lovell and fellow crewmen, John L. Swigert and Fred W. Haise, working closely with Houston ground controllers, converted their lunar module "Aquarius" into an effective lifeboat. Their emergency activation and operation of lunar module systems conserved both electrical power and water in sufficient supply to assure their safety and survival while in space and for the return to earth.

Lovell is a recipient of the Congressional Space Medal of Honor and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Among his business interests is a restaurant in Lake Forest, Illinois. By coincidence I saw Jim Lovell on television just last night during a special on Apollo 13. What a cool cucumber in a crisis!
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2008, 11:28 AM   #66
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 26, 1939 - Wayne Handley



Wayne Handley is a former naval aviator, ag pilot, aerobatic champion, and preeminent airshow performer.

Wayne Handley first flew an air show in 1984 at Auburn, CA after training himself in the precisions of aerial control. He developed, and is most famous for, the inverted flat spin. Previously, performers such as Art Scholl had done a few spins. Wayne made it into an art form and still holds the record of 67 inverted flat spins. He probably should be most honored as the person who taught such performers as Sean D. Tucker, Bill Stein and Chandy Clanton in the intricacies of aerobatics. The late great Leo Loudenslager, himself seven times the National Aerobatics Champion, once referred to Wayne as "the guy with the perfect stick."

Beginning his air show appearances in the 1980’s (after an aviation career that began in 1957 as a naval aviator then an ag pilot and multiple time aerobatic champion) Wayne has logged over 26,000 hours of flight time. His air show career was distinguished by such showmanship and innovation as the “Agrobatics” performance he developed. This unique presentation brought a whole new understanding and appreciation of the challenges faced by crop dusters to audiences across the country. His performances were always awe inspiring and left audiences wanting more.

Wayne has always pushed the performance envelope while emphasizing safety. His record 67 inverted flat spins (which he subsequently expanded to 78) is but one example. In 1999, the last year of regular air show performances by Wayne, he established a time to climb world record for 3,000 meters and then six months later set another record for 6,000 meters at Oshkosh. These are just some examples of his performance accomplishments, all of which were represented during his air show flying.

Wayne has demonstrated innovation in his air show performances since the beginning but none more so than his vision and imagination which resulted in the Turbo Raven. That aerobatic airplane, with a positive thrust-to-weight ratio was Wayne’s dream come true. This one of a kind aircraft could go straight up, stop, then go straight up again. The blazing 450 degrees per second roll rate, top speed of 300 knots and reversible pitch propeller made it a stunning performer. It was this “fastest climbing propeller driven air plane in the world” that enabled Wayne to set the time to climb records. Wayne with the Turbo Raven was able to again push the performance and innovation envelopes and thrill air show audiences nationwide.

In 1996, he was presented the Bill Barber Award for Showmanship presented annually by World Airshow News to an airshow performer who has demonstrated superb showmanship ability. In 1997, Wayne received the Art Scholl Showmanship Award presented annually by ICAS (International Council of Air Shows) to the airshow act that best exemplifies the qualities of showmanship. In 2000, Wayne was honored by the Aero Club of Northern California, a branch of the National Aeronautic Association, with its Crystal Eagle Award. In 2001, he was awarded the ICAS Sword of Excellence in recognition of his outstanding service and personal contribution to the airshow industry. In December 2005, Wayne was inducted into the ICAS Foundation Air Show Hall of Fame. Wayne now spends most of his workdays coaching aerobatic competitors, airshow performers, ag pilots, and military pilots. He also remains quite active on the speaking circuit, delighting audiences by sharing his vast aviation knowledge, his wonderful aviation stories, and his dry sense of humor.


March 26, 1885 - Robert Blackburn


Robert Blackburn OBE, FRAeS, (March 26, 1885 - September 10, 1955) was an English aviation pioneer and the founder of Blackburn Aircraft.



He was born in Kirkstall, Leeds, England. He attended Leeds Modern School and graduated in engineering at the University of Leeds. Developing an interest in aviation Blackburn travelled to France to immerse himself in and learn from the then world leading nation in aviation matters. Blackburn constructed his first aircraft in 1909 using such materials as wood, brass, steel, fabric and string.

With the assistance of Harry Goodyear Blackburn built in 1910 the Blackburn Monoplane; such was its heaviness that it was consequently nicknamed the 'Heavy Type Monoplane'. Unfortunately while testing the aircraft on the coast of Yorkshire Blackburn lost control of the aircraft and crash-landed it into sand dunes on 24 May 1910.

Undeterred Blackburn promptly turned his attention to his next aircraft. Within four years, in June 1914, Blackburn established the Blackburn Aeroplane Company (later the Blackburn Aeroplane and Motor Car Company). Given the advent of war later that year Blackburn's timing was fortuitous. His company was to become a leading supplier to the British Government during wartime.

The principal aircraft produced by Blackburn's company during wartime was the Blackburn Kangaroo, a twin-engine bi-plane adopted by the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) for use in anti-submarine operations based in the North Sea. I think the company will best be remembered for the Blackburn Buccaneer which served with the RAF and the Royal Navy.

Twice married with three children Robert Blackburn died in Devon in September 1955 at the age of 70. His company was subsequently taken over by the Hawker Siddeley Group in 1964. He was also the founder of Scarcroft golf club.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2008, 10:58 AM   #67
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 27, 1863 - Henry Royce



Sir Frederick Henry, Baronet Royce - the English industrialist and engineer who was one of the founders of Rolls-Royce Ltd., manufacturer of luxury automobiles and airplane engines.


Henry Royce was 9 when his father died and he went out to work to support his family. At age 15 Royce began an engineering apprenticeship with the Great Northern Railway company at Peterborough, and by 1882 he was chief electrical engineer for Liverpool's Electric Light and Power Company. In 1884 he set out on his first private venture, manufacturing electical fittings, dynamos and eventually cranes.

With his fascination for all things mechanical he became interested in motor cars and bought his first in 1901. The car did not meet his high standards and so he first improved it and then decided to manufacture a car of his own which he did in a corner of the workshop in 1904, and then 2 more. One of the cars was sold to a friend of Charles Rolls who had a car sales showroom and a meeting was arranged between the two. Rolls was impressed and agreed to take all the cars Royce could make provided they had at least four cylinders and were called Rolls-Royce. The first Rolls-Royce car was made in December 1904.

In addition to cars, Royce was interested in airplane engines and his 1928 design, the "R" engine was to power the Supermarine seaplanes that would set new world speed records and snare the Scheider Trophy for Britain. The refined version of this engine powered the first flight to break the 400 mph barrier in September 1931.

Following the success of the “R” engine, it was clear that they had an engine that would be of use to the Royal Air Force. As no Government assistance was forthcoming at first, the “Private Venture 12” engine was developed independently "in the national interest" in 1932. Henry Royce did not live to see it's completion but this was to become the Rolls-Royce Merlin that changed the face of WWII.

Royce, whose motto "Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble", had already been awarded the O.B.E. after the First World War, was created a Baronet, of Seaton in the County of Rutland, on June 26, 1930 for his services to British Aviation. He died on 22 April 1933, and in 1962 a memorial window dedicated to his memory was unveiled in Westminster Abbey. The only time an engineer has been honoured in this way.



March 27, 1905 - Elsie MacGill



Elizabeth Muriel Gregory "Elsie" MacGill - "the Queen of the Hurricanes" - was the world's first female aircraft designer.

Elsie MacGill's mother was a female judge and an advocate of women's suffrage and influenced Elsie's decision to study engineering. MacGill graduated from the University of Toronto in 1927; she was the first Canadian woman to earn a degree in electrical engineering. After graduation she took a job with American Austin Car Company in the US, and when they started to move into aircraft manufacturing she enrolled at the University of Michigan in aeronautical engineering. In 1929, she was the first woman in North America to graduate with a masters degree in aeronautical engineering.

Just before graduating she was struck by polio and was told that she would probably spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair; she refused to accept that possibility and forced herself to learn to walk with two strong metal canes. To help pay her bills, she wrote magazine articles about planes and flying during her doctoral studies at MIT.

After working as an engineer at Fairchilds, she was hired as Chief Aeronautical Engineer at Canada Car and Foundry (CC&F, CanCar), becoming the first woman in the world to hold such a position. At CC&F she designed and tested a new training aircraft, the Maple Leaf Trainer II which was used in Mexico where its high-altitude performance was important given the many airfields from which it had to operate. Although she was never a pilot, she always insisted on being aboard on test flights.

During WWII the factory was selected to build the Hawker Hurricane fighter aircraft for the Royal Air Force. MacGill transformed the factory into a streamlined production line and designed airframe parts that were interchangeable amongst different airplane types, which would facilitate servicing in the field. The factory quickly expanded from about 500 workers to 4,500 by war's end. She became something of a national hero and in 1942 a Comic Book was published about her wartime efforts and dubbing her with the soubriquet "Queen of the Hurricanes". One of her contributions to the Hawker Hurricane was designing solutions to allow the aircraft to operate during the winter, introducing de-icing controls and a system for fitting skis for landing on snow.

She and her husband later set up an aeronautical consultancy and in 1946 she wrote the International Air Worthiness regulations for the design and production of commercial aircraft. Later in life she became increasingly involved in advocating women's rights. She was named to the Royal Commission on the Status of Women in 1967 and was awarded the Centennial Medal by the Canadian government the same year.

She died in a motor car accident in 1980. In addition to many engineering awards, she received the 1975 Amelia Earhart Medal in 1975 and in 1983 was inducted into the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame.



March 27, 1949 - Brian Jones





Brian Jones was one of 2 pilots who completed the first non-stop circumnavigation of the world by balloon.

Born in Bristol, and a former former Royal Air Force pilot, Brian Jones entered the world of ballooning in the 1980s. In 1997 he embarked on the attempt of the British-built, Swiss-sponsored Breitling Orbiter 3 to circle the world nonstop. Scores of previous attempts had been unsuccessful, notably 4 by British billionaire and balloonist, Sir Richard Branson.

On Mar. 1–20, 1999, he and Swiss psychiatrist, Dr. Jacques Piccard succeeded where many had failed, floating from Switzerland southwest to Mauritania, then eastward across Africa, Asia, the Pacific, North America, and the Atlantic to a landing in the Egyptian desert.

The Breitling Orbiter 3 was constructed by Cameron Balloons of Bristol, England, and was 180 feet (55 meters) tall. Piccard and Jones were squeezed into a capsule that measured only 17 feet 10 inches (5.4 meters) long and 10 feet 3 inches (3.1 meters) high.

"The two men broke distance, endurance, and time records, traveling 19 days, 21 hours, and 55 minutes. Their route traveled south from the Swiss Alps over North Africa, where they caught the jet stream heading east toward the Arabian Desert, crossing India, and over Southeast Asia. They had a smooth Pacific crossing that they completed in six days. But east of Central America and 7 miles (11 kilometers) up, the balloonists were trapped in light spiraling winds and temperatures dropped to 46 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees Celsius) in their cabin, causing breathing problems. Winds finally improved and they picked up the jet stream again, which propelled them across the Atlantic Ocean on their final leg.

The two men were aided by advances in balloon technology and weather forecasting, as well as by the global positioning system (GPS). These advances allowed the ground control team to track the balloon's route and calculate its best altitude to take advantage of high-altitude jet stream winds that blew at velocities as high as 200 miles per hour (321 kilometers per hour) The balloon traveled at altitudes as high as 36,000 feet (11,000 meters) and as fast as 105 miles per hour (176 kilometers per hour) across the Pacific Ocean.

The crew also had to obtain permission to fly over each of the countries along the route. This can be a problem because the wind may carry the balloon over countries where permission has been denied. In past attempts, flights have had to be aborted because permission was denied. One balloon was even shot down and the pilots killed by a Belarussian helicopter gunship on September 12, 1995.
"

This final great aviation first which had eluded so many was accomplished by making the longest and furthest flight in history - in any form of flying machine within the earth's atmosphere. Seven world records were established. For this achievement, he received awards including the Harmon Trophy, the Hubbard Medal, the FAI Gold Air Medal and the Charles Green Salver. They wrote Around the World in 20 Days (1999) about their flight.

Jones is currently working on a project with fellow balloonist and round the world contender Andy Elson, as Flight Director on a project to fly a balloon to the edge of space - more than 40km high!
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2008, 10:40 AM   #68
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 28, 1912 - Marina Raskova



Marina Mikhailovna Raskova was a famous Russian pilot/navigator, often referred to as the "Russian Amelia Earhart". She founded three female air regiments which would eventually fly over 30,000 sorties in World War II.

Raskova became a famous aviator as both a pilot and a navigator for Russia in the 1930s. She was the first woman to become a navigator in the Soviet Air Force in 1933. A year later, she started teaching at the Zhukovskii Air Academy, also a first for a woman. As significantly in the eyes of the Soviet Union, which gave its aviators celebrity status, she set a number of long distance records. Most of these record flights occurred in 1937 and 1938, while she was still teaching at the air academy.

The most famous of these records was the flight of the Rodina - a converted DB-2 long range bomber, on September 24-25, 1938. She was the navigator of an all-female crew. The goal was to set an international women's record for a straight-line distance flight. The plan was to fly from Moscow to Komsomolsk (in the Far East). The flight took 26 hours and 29 minutes, over a straight line distance of 5,947 km, but the ordeal took 10 days when the plane was unable to find an airfield due to poor visibility. Because the navigator's cockpit had no entrance to the rest of the plane and was vulnerable in a crash landing, Raskova parachuted out before they touched down. She had forgotten her emergency kit and was unable to find the plane for 10 days, with no water and almost no food; all three women were decorated with "The Hero of the Soviet Union" award, the first females ever to receive it and the only ones before World War II.

During WWII Raskova, herself an airforce pilot, convinced the military to form three combat regiments of women. Not only would the women be pilots, but also the support staff and engineers for these regiments. She served as CO of the 125th Guards Bomber Aviation regiment. She perished when her aircraft crashed attempting to make a forced landing at the base's airfield. She received the first state funeral of the war, and her body was buried in Red Square. She soon became the namesake of an American Liberty ship, the SS Marina Raskova, launched in June 1943.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 10:57 AM   #69
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 29, 1887 - Albert C. Read



Albert Cushing Read was a naval aviator and the first man to fly across the Atlantic.

Read was born in New Hampshire in 1887 and graduated with high honors from the Naval Academy Class of 1907. While he served in the fleet, he studied all the information that he could find on aviation. When the Navy opened its first training school at Pensacola, Florida, in 1912, Read was among the first to be selected for training. After he soloed in 1915 he was designated Naval Aviator No. 24. When he served aboard the USS Carolina, the first Navy ship provided with aircraft, Read made numerous catapult take-offs as part of his regular flight operations.

When America entered the World War I in 1917, the Navy ordered a series of large Navy-Curtiss flying boats and planned to deliver them to Europe by flying across the Atlantic. They were magnificent specimens and their wings spanned a distance greater than the Wright's first flight. Their hulls resembled large covered lifeboats and they were the first four-engine airplanes built in America.

The war ended abruptly before they were finished. After the war the Navy decided to attempt the first transatlantic flight with a fleet of 3 of these planes. The route began at Long Island, ran to Nova Scotia, proceeded to Newfoundland, then southeastward across the Atlantic via the Azores to Portugal, finally finishing in England. A string of destroyers would cruise along the route and pour out black smoke to mark the route in the daytime. At night, their orders were to point their searchlights windward and fire star shells periodically to identify themselves.

The Navy placed Read in command of the NC-4 and its crew of five. Despite having to cut an engine due to an oil leak and a 2nd throwing a connecting rod, Read made a forced landing on the ocean and taxied for 5 hours to reach Cape Cod where the leak was repaired. He completed the next stage on 3 engines until the 4th could be repaired.

Reunited with the fleet, heavy fog struck before reaching the Azores and 2 planes got lost. When sure the other 2 crews were safe, Read continued on to Lisbon where they received a hero's welcome. The triumph of the first flight across the Atlantic was theirs and Read received the Portuguese award of Commander of the Military Order of the Tower and Sword.

They continued on to Plymouth, England and arrived on May 31st. The British presented Read with the Royal Air Force Cross for his historic flight, and upon his return to Washington, Read received the Distinguished Service Medal and a special medal struck to commemorate the NC-4 flight. He and his crew then made an extensive goodwill tour of the country in the NC-4.

Returning to regular Navy Aviation duty, Read successively served in numerous important commands until World War II. During that war, he became Chief of the Air Technical Training in Chicago and then commanded the Navy air activities at Norfolk until the end of the war. For this service he received the Legion of Merit.

Albert Read died on October 10th, 1967.


March 29, 1912 - Hanna Reitsch



Perhaps the world's greatest woman pilot, but denied by history as she was a Nazi test pilot. She was the first to cross the Alps in a glider, flew the first practical helicopter, the first woman to fly a jet and the first person to make a sub-orbital space flight in a manned V1 rocket!

The daughter of an ophthalmologist, Hanna Reitsch set out to become a flying missionary doctor. The Treaty of Versailles precluded her flying powered aircraft and she took to gliding. The diminutive blonde shone and bested the male pilots in every competition. She abandoned medical school to become a professional glider pilot and did stunt work for movies.

From 1931, when she set the women's world record for non-stop gliding (five and a half hours), extended to eleven and a half in 1933, to her world record in non-stop distance flight for gliders (305 km) in 1936, and her woman's gliding world record for point-to-point flight in 1939, Hanna Reitsch's feats were unrivaled. In 1934 she set the world's altitude record for women (2,800 m), three years later she made the first crossing of the Alps in a glider, and in 1938 the first indoor helicopter flight in the Deutschlandhalle, Berlin.

This attracted Hitler's attention and she became a civilian test pilot for the secretly-formed Luftwaffe. She tested the gliders which silently deposited German troops on the Maginot line in 1940, participating as a pilot in the raids. She test flew Stukas, Bf109s - just about everything the Third Reich had. She nearly lost her life 3 times - testing techniques to cut barrage balloon cables, testing the jet-powered Me-163 Komet ( In a minute and a half after takeoff it climbed at a 65-degree angle to 30,000 feet. It traveled 500 mph -- the fastest any human had ever gone), and even piloting a manned version of the V1 rocket (perhaps making her the world's first astronaut in the 1940's!).

She became a fervent supporter of the Nazi cause and spent the last 3 days in the Fuhrerbunker before Hitler committed suicide. In 1945 she flew the last plane out of Berlin hours before the fall of the city. Her lack of repentance kept her from the history books.

She spent her last years quietly. The darling of Nazi Germany was a post-war outcast. She continued to fly and was generous in helping other women pilots from other countries. And, at the age of 65, the year before she died, she set a new women's distance record in a glider.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 08:28 AM   #70
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 30, 1754 - Jean-Francois Pilatre de Rozier



One of the earliest pioneers of aviation, Pilatre de Rozier was also the world's first aircraft fatality.


Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier was a French chemistry and physics teacher who taught in Paris. He became a valet de chambre to King Louis XVI's sister-in-law and acquired his own museum. Here he would perform experiments in physics and researched the new field of gases.

In June 1783, he witnessed the first balloon flight of the Montgolfier brothers. Captivated by this, he made his own first tethered ascent only 4 months later!

He made history by making the first manned free flight on 21 November 1783, accompanied by the ambitious Marquis d'Arlandes. During the 25-minute flight using a Montgolfier hot air balloon, they traveled 12 kilometres from the Château de la Muette to the outskirts of Paris, attaining an altitude of 3,000 feet.

In a further flight on 23 June, 1784 with Joseph Proust, he flew a Montgolfier balloon at an altitude of approximately 3,000 metres, above the clouds. They travelled 52 km in 45 minutes before cold and turbulence forced them to descend. They set records for speed, altitude and distance travelled.

De Rozier's next plan was an attempt to cross the English Channel from France to England. A Montgolfier balloon would not be up to the task, requiring large stocks of fuel for the hot air, so his balloon was a combination hydrogen and hot air balloon. It was prepared in the autumn of 1784, but the attempt was not launched until after another Frenchman, Jean-Pierre Blanchard, and American companion, Dr John Jeffries, flew across the English Channel in a hydrogen gas balloon on 7 January 1785, from England to France.

After many delays, he and his companion, Pierre Romain set out on 15 June, 1785 to cross from France to England but the balloon crashed near Wimereux in the Pas-de-Calais, claiming the lives of the 2 aviators - the first known victims of an air crash. A commemorative obelisk was later erected at the site of the crash.

The modern hybrid gas and hot air balloon is named the Rozière balloon after his pioneering design.



30 March, 1894 - Sergey Vladimirovich Ilyushin



Sergey Vladimirovich Ilyushin was an outstanding Russian aeronautical engineer and aircraft constructor.

Born to a poor peasant family in Vologda, Ilyushin studied whilst he worked from an early age. At age 16 he was working cleaning the runway at the St Petersburg airfield during the staging of Russia's first-ever aviation week. He was captivated by the famous pilots and their flying machines and began taking flying lessons - passing his pilots license in 1917. He joined the Red Army during the Revolution and served as an aircraft mechanic.

Once he was ordered to take apart a shot-down enemy airplane and take it to Moscow. That hands-on experience was not lost on Sergey who was now increasingly thinking about someday being able to design his own aircraft. After the civil war he joined the Air Force Academy during which time he designed and built a record-breaking glider but, after graduating, his dream of designing aircraft remained on hold until he was appointed to head the Cental Design Bureau in 1931. This would become the Ilyushin Design Bureau.

Ilyuyshin’s first plane, a long-range bomber, was immediately taken up by the army. Dubbed the Moskva, it established a world endurance record in 1938, flying nonstop from Moscow to Vladivostok and back. The IL-4 bomber would become Russia's main long-range bomber in WWII.

Soon afterwards Ilyushin designed his famous IL 2 Shturmovik ground attack plane which pioneered the use of armour in the airframe. More than 40,000 IL-2s were produced – more than any designer had ever constructed anywhere before or since.

After the war, production of a family of civil planes began in 1946 with the IL-12. It was followed by the IL-14, IL-18, and IL-62 - the latter 2 enjoying success on the world aircraft market.

Sergey Ilyushin’s talent and hard work won him three gold stars of Hero of Socialist labor and a wealth of state awards. Despite his success, Ilyushin was always a self-effacing man and hating to talk about himself, claiming “It’s planes that should speak about their maker, not the other way round.” He died in 1977. His legacy lives on in many classic airplanes such as the IL-76 and newer designs like the IL-96.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 09:07 AM   #71
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

March 31, 1927 - Vladimir Sergeyevich Ilyushin



Russia's Legendary Chief Test Pilot for Sukhoi OKB - now more generally known as a result of a TV documentary that claims he was the first man in space, 5 days before Gagarin.



Lieutenant General Vladimir Sergeyevich Ilyushin is the eldest son of aircraft designer Sergei Ilyushin and a noted test pilot in the Soviet Union. Ironically, he spent most of his career as a test pilot for the Sukhoi OKB, the rival to his father's design bureau.

In an illustrious career that won him the highest state prizes and military promotions several years ahead of the norm throughout his life, he was the first to fly nearly every one of Sukhoi's military planes. Over his life he flew 145 different types of aircraft and made a number of important first and record flights.

Graduating as a test pilot in 1952, he went to work for Sukhoi in 1957. Two years later he set a new altitude record of 28,857 m aboard the T-431, a modified Su-9 fighter. About 1960 he was allegedly involved in a serious automobile accident that required a prolonged recovery - a portion of it in a clinic in China.

Throughout the remainder of the 60's he continued to test pilot and set new records at Sukhoi. In 1971 he became Deputy Chief Designer of the Bureau and Chief Test Pilot. In 1972 he made the first flight of the T4 supersonic bomber (see pic) and in 1973 was promoted to Lt General of the Soviet Air Force. A quiet and retiring man, he still lives in Moscow and collects automobiles.

He was rocketed into the public spotlight (excuse the pun) in 1961 when he was alleged to have flown into orbit on 7 April - 5 days before the féted orbital flight of Yuri Gagarin. The story was started by the Moscow corespondent of the British Communist paper Daily Worker, Dennis Ogden. The next day Eduard Brobovsky, a French journalist, named the "cosmonaut" as Ilyushin and it was widely reported in the Western press but denied by the USSR. There were already stories abounding of phantom cosmonauts that may have perished in space - such was the Cold War. The story went that he had made 1 controlled and 2 uncontrolled orbits before crashing badly in China. To avoid embarrassment at the failed landing the authorities were said to have hushed it up and broadcast the success of Gagarin a few days later.

The story re-ignited after Dr. Elliott Haimoff produced a documentary in 1999, proclaiming Ilyushin the first man in space but hard evidence remains lacking. Renowned Russian space program researcher, James Oberg, has investigated extensively and has concluded the claims are unfounded and lack any substantive evidence.

Whether he did or not orbit in a Vostok capsule, Vladimir Ilyushin remains a legend of aviation, a Soviet counterpart to Gen. Chuck Yeager.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2008, 08:49 AM   #72
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

April 1, 1906 - Alexander Sergeyevich Yakovlev



Alexander Sergeyevich Yakovlev was a Russian aeronautical engineer and airplane designer. He designed the Yakovlev military aircraft and founded the Yakovlev Design Bureau.

Yakovlev was a founder of Soviet aviation modeling, air gliding, and aviation sport. He built the AVF-10 glider in 1924 and ultralight aircraft AIR-1 in 1927. These were his very first aircraft used for sport and training.

He worked as a motor technician beginning in 1924, and then became a student of the Red Army Air Force Academy. His first aircraft design bureau was established in 1932 at an aviation plant where he had been working as an engineer. He became the head designer designer in 1935, - his first designs were for a monoplane trainer - and the plant renamed the Yakovlev Design Bureau.

He was the inventor of a series of very successful fighter planes during WWII- all of them variations on the Yak-1. This was the product of a 1938 Soviet brief requesting a fighter of mostly wood construction for ease of maintenance and more importantly - production. The initial design was known as the Ya-26 Krasavec and flew in 1939. Power was derived from a single Klimov-brand engine developing some 1,100+ horsepower. Mass production soon followed and the Yak variants were to become the most numerously produced fighters of the war - exceeding some 37,000! The Yak-1 was a highly capable performer that quickly endeared herself to her pilots and allowed Russia to compete with the technologically superior Luftwaffe.

He was Soviet Vice-Minister of Aviation Industry between 1940-1946. While holding that position, Yakovlev played thwarted the projects of many other soviet airplane designers. Many projects were cancelled or postponed for perceived deficiencies and their designers labeled “saboteurs”. At the same time, the state officials tended to turn a blind eye to Yakovlev-designed planes when they were having technical issues. Many have noted the influence Yakovlev had on Stalin and his willingness to use it to further his own agenda whilst controlling his opponents. His role in cancelling development of the most sophisticated soviet military airplane of the time – the Polikarpov I-180 of Nikolai Nikolaevich Polikarpov - is well-known.

He was a correspondent-member of the USSR Academy of Science in 1943, and was awarded the Hero of Socialist Labor in both 1940 and 1957. In 1946 he was awarded the title "General-Colonel of Aviation". In 1976 he became academician of the USSR Academy of Science. Yakovlev retired August 21, 1984.

Post script - there must be some sort of Russian public holiday about the end of June - sure is a popular time for famous Russian birthdays...
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 09:33 AM   #73
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

April 2, 1841 - Clement Ader



Clément Ader was a French engineer & one of the earliest pioneers of powered flight. He may well have achieved powered flight of a heavier-than-air machine in 1890 - 13 years before the Wright brothers.

Ader was born the son of a carpenter and a self-taught engineer. After graduating from a technical institute he worked briefly for a railway company, and then -- like the Wright brothers -- became a successful designer and builder of racing bicycles. Later, he pioneered introducing the telephone in France. Overall, over his life, he held no less than 58 French and foreign patents covering a variety of inventions, including a microphone and public address system.

Ader had been fascinated by flight, and spent hours studying insects, birds and bats to see how they flew. As well, he pondered what flight might mean to warfare, once writing "Military aviation shall become all powerful, and control the destiny of nations." He published in 1909 "L'Aviation Militaire", a very popular book which went through 10 editions in the five years until the beginning of World War I, which is especially famous for its vision of air warfare and its precise description of the concept of the modern aircraft carrier with a flat flight deck, an island superstructure, deck elevators and a hangar bay.

So interested was he in natural flight that, at the age of 42, he traveled to Algeria where he ventured deep into the desert to observe soaring vultures. It was the bat that made the greatest impact on his thinking, however, and he used its wing shape as the layout for his first airplane, the Éole (after Aeolus, the Greek god of the winds), which he attempted to fly in 1890. To power this craft, Ader designed a lightweight steam engine, which drove a single propeller; even the propeller reflected his obsession natural flight, as each of the propellers' four blades resembled a large feather.

On Oct. 9, 1890, at the Château d'Armainvilliers (the estate of a banker friend), Ader made a high-speed run down a carriageway, and the Éole skimmed the earth at an altitude of about a foot for about 50 meters (165 feet). Ader recollected later that "for a few seconds I was suspended in a state of indefinable joy." In fact, Ader was quite lucky, for the Éole had no significant provisions for any sort of control, and had he gotten higher, he might well have crashed and been killed or at least seriously injured.

The Éole never apparently flew again, but Ader was able to secure government funding in February 1892 to develop a military airplane--the first military airplane acquisition contract in history. This aircraft, the steam-powered twin-engine Avion III, made only one flight attempt, at the French Army's Satory proving ground, on Oct. 14, 1897, with limited success. Ader effectively left the aviation field afterwards. Later in life, in response to unjustified criticism of his earlier Éole, Ader claimed both it and the Avion III had, in fact, been great successes. This claim has muddied subsequent aviation history considerably.

In 1911, in honor of Ader's work, the French general Pierre-Auguste Rocques, chief of French Army aviation, directed that Ader's term avion would be the official word for an airplane, replacing the earlier French word aeroplane dating to J. Pline in the 1850s and used by Pénaud and other French pioneers. This continues to the present day.

Ader died in 1925 at the age of 84, having lived well into the era of powered flight. In retrospect, he was, undoubtedly a notable pioneer whose perceptions about the future of air warfare were largely correct. As a designer of airplanes, however, he was too slavish in his copying of birds and bats, and he showed little appreciation for the importance of flight control. This alone doomed his efforts to ultimate failure. The Avion III has survived, and is on exhibit in the Musée de Arts et Métiers in Paris. In 1938, France issued a postage stamp honoring him, and Airbus named one of its aircraft assembly sites in Toulouse after him.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2008, 10:35 AM   #74
RJ Captain
 
coilsw6's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Age: 61
Posts: 449
coilsw6 is getting startedcoilsw6 is getting startedcoilsw6 is getting startedcoilsw6 is getting started
Re: Today's Birthday...

Hi Doc,
not butting into your thread I hope. Just wanted to let you know have just spent the last couple of hours catching up with what you have posted in regards to ' Today's Birthday.....' thread. Amazing stuff. Thanks for taking the time and effort to do this. I'm sure there are many members who like myself take a great interest and appreciate your efforts.
__________________
All the best, Colin.
coilsw6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2008, 09:53 AM   #75
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 58
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Quote:
Originally Posted by coilsw6 View Post
Hi Doc,
not butting into your thread I hope. Just wanted to let you know have just spent the last couple of hours catching up with what you have posted in regards to ' Today's Birthday.....' thread. Amazing stuff. Thanks for taking the time and effort to do this. I'm sure there are many members who like myself take a great interest and appreciate your efforts.
Always glad to have any feedback about any of these posts. Glad you are enjoying the series. Sorry for the interruption but a recent storm has put me "off-air" these last few days. Will try and get back up to date tonight!

April 3, 1926 - Virgil "Gus" Grissom



Lt Colonel Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom had been part of the U.S. manned space program since it began in 1959, having been selected as one of NASA's Original Seven Mercury Astronauts. He was the first man to fly in space twice. Earmarked to become the first man on the moon, he perished during pre-flight testing as Commander of Apollo 1.

Known universally as "Gus", Grissom enlisted in the Air Force in 1944 but he did not get the chance to fly before Japan surrendered and he left, going on to earn a Bachelors Degree in mechanical engineering before re-enlisting in the USAF, set on becoming a test pilot. He received his pilot wings in March 1951 and was posted to Korea where he flew F-86 Sabres. Grissom flew 100 combat missions during the Korean conflict with the 334th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and was denied his request to serve 25 more. He returned to the US and became an instructor pilot at Bryan AFB.

In 1955 Grissom entered the Air Force Institute of Technology at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio to study aeronautical engineering, and the following year entered the test pilot school at Edwards, where he accomplished his dream of becoming a test fighter pilot.

Virgil I. Grissom was selected as one of the seven original astronaut trainees for Project Mercury in 1959. He became the second American to go into space when the Liberty Bell 7 was launched on July 21, 1961. Following splashdown from that flight, Grissom almost drowned when his space capsule filled with water and sank into the Atlantic before it could be recovered.

After the flight, NASA awarded Grissom with its Distinguished Service Medal and he received his astronaut's wings on Dec. 7, 1961. On July 15, 1962, he was promoted to the rank of major. He received the first General Thomas D. White Trophy on July 19, 1962, for being "The Air Force member who has made the most outstanding contribution to the nation's progress in aerospace".

Grissom helped design and construct the spacecraft of Project Gemini, a series of missions designed as an intermediate step between Project Mercury and the Apollo Moon project. On April 13, 1964, he was selected to be the first Gemini pilot and on March 23, 1965, the first two-man space flight was launched with Grissom and John W. Young co-piloting Gemini III. During the mission he achieved another first by maneuvering the craft manually from one orbit to another. Both astronauts were awarded NASA's Exceptional Service medals.

While serving as commander of the Apollo I spacecraft in January 1967, Grissom died at age 40 in one of NASA's worst disasters. During a flight simulation at Cape Kennedy in Florida, fire engulfed his space capsule and Grissom, along with fellow astronauts Ed White and Roger Chaffee, suffocated. Had he not perished, Grissom had already been selected by Deke Slayton to be the first man on the moon!

Grissom was a Lieutenant Colonel at the time of his death and had logged a total of 4,600 hours flying time, including 3,500 hours in jet aircraft. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:16 PM.

Latest Threads
- by bskc8th
- by PSA
- by PSA
 

Models of the Week
 


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2022 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

 

SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2