Today's Birthday... - Page 2 - Wings900 Discussion Forums Wings900 - Model News

Go Back   Wings900 Discussion Forums > Wings900 Ground Control > General Squawk Talk

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Old 02-12-2008, 08:46 AM   #16
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 12, 1809 - Abraham Lincoln



The 16th President of the United States of America was assassinated long before fixed wing aircraft would grace the sky. He is widely considered the greatest of all presidents and he redefined republicanism - leading the Union in the American Civil War and gently trying to mend the nation after years of divisive and bitter fighting.

It may be said that Lincoln was Commander-in-Chief of the United States' first aerial forces. He recognized the worthiness of observation balloons in warfare, even though their use up until then had been quite limited. He established the Union Army Balloon Corps after Thaddeus Lowe demonstrated his silk hydrogen balloon on the White House lawns. Seven balloons were commissioned but, although the reconnaissance was useful, most Union generals distrusted the information. Nevertheless, it was the first time that aerial services were used extensively in warfare.



Today, the legacy of military aviation under the name of "Honest Abe" lives on; the second Nimitz-class aircraft carrier of the US Navy, CVN-72, is named "USS Abraham Lincoln". It has recently been providing air support to coalition troops serving in Iraq.




Today's post is dedicated to one of Lincoln's best-read enthusiasts - Emiliano Herran.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-13-2008, 05:49 AM   #17
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 13, 1923 - Gen Charles Elwood "Chuck" Yeager



Undoubtedly the most famous test pilot ever, Chuck Yeager became a legend in his own lifetime rising from the ranks of Army private (and aircraft mechanic) to retiring from the USAF as a general. He was shot down after his first kill in 1944 but evaded capture and escaped to Spain with the aid of the French resistance. Against Army policy, he appealed directly to Eisenhower to be reinstated to combat flying and went on to become an ace with 11.5 official kills, including a jet Me262 from his P-51 Mustang.

After the war he stayed on with the newly-formed USAF as a test pilot and instructor. He achieved world fame as the first man to break the sound barrier in level flight in the Bell X-1 (which he did with broken ribs) in October, 1947. He kept setting world airspeed records and flew at over Mach 2 in 1952.

He survived a parachute bailout from a Starfighter in which he was badly burned by debris that entangled in his chute and would later train over half the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts before NASA took over in 1966. After his astronaut school was disbanded he commanded a squadron in the Vietnam War as a full colonel before being promoted to Brigadier in 1968.

He was in Melbourne last year in the 50th anniversary year of his breaking the Sound Barrier and on Oct 14, 2007 broke the sound barrier again at the controls of an F-15 Eagle at age 84!

Truly a legend of aviation - if you have not read "The Right Stuff" or seen the film, you should!!!



Feb 13, 1909 - Sir Reginald Ansett
Founder Ansett Airlines



Reg Ansett was born in rural Victoria and learned a trade before starting a bus service in the 1920's. He obtained a pilot's license in 1926 but did not start his flying business until state government passed legislation prohibiting competition to the state railway. In 1936 he began Ansett Airways flying a single Fokker between Hamilton and Melbourne. WWII saw interruption of passenger services but Reg made money flying charter services for the US military based in Australia - enough to buy more planes after the war. Government at that time provided some subsidies but the 2 airline policy limiting major route to the government-owned TAA and Ivan Holyman's ANA meant that he could only fly regional routes. He survived a takeover bid by ANA and when Holyman died in 1957 he bought out ANA. He was an aggressive businessman and had major interests in freight and also founded a television network that would later be take over by Rupert Murdoch.

Although Ansett was disliked by many, he established one of the best-loved airlines the world has seen. Ansett Airlines was based out of Melbourne and its collapse in 2000 rocked Australia. The airline is still missed by many for the fantastic service it provided.



Feb 13, 1903 - Georgy Beriev



Georgy Beriev was born in Tbilisi, Georgia and studied engineering. Because of his brilliance in aircraft design, he was made head of the SeaPlane Design Bureau in 1936 and since that time, Beriev has become the world's pre-eminent designer of seaplanes and amphibians. He died in Moscow in 1979.
__________________



Last edited by flyingdoc; 02-13-2008 at 04:18 PM.
flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2008, 02:57 AM   #18
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 14, 1913 - Tony Le Vier
Test Pilot Extraordinaire



Tony Le Vier was an extraordinary test pilot with a long and distinguished career - he was the chief test pilot for Lockheed from 1945 to 1955 and then its director of flying operations until retiring in 1974. He made more than 24,000 flights in about 260 types of aircraft, including pioneering most of the US' first jet planes. He was the pilot of the U-2 spy plane's maiden flight on on Aug 8, 1955.

Early on he was inspired by Lindbergh's epic Atlantic crossing and was soon hooked on flying, becoming a barnstormer. He won the Greve Trophy in 1938 and finished second in the premier Thompson Trophy Race of 1939, then considered the nation's greatest test of flying skill.

IN WWII, he served as chief test pilot for General Motors Corp and then Lockheed from 1941. He taught many pilots in Britain how to fly the P-38 Lightning. In 1943 he went to work at the Skunk Works project, which has produced many of Americas top-secret military aircraft, such as the U-2, the SR-71 and the Stealth bomber.

In June 1944, he made the first flight of the XP-80A, the experimental version of the Army Air Forces' first operational jet, the Shooting Star. A wing flap failed to retract, but he brought the plane down safely.

In March 1945, while he was flying the XP-80A at 10,000 feet over the Mojave Desert at 550 m.p.h., the engine disintegrated and sliced off the tail. Mr. Le Vier bailed out and suffered two crushed vertebrae and was hospitalized in a steel brace for five months.

On another occasion in 1948 the canopy on the T-bird jet he was flying tore away, ripping the helmet from his head. He was lucky to survive.

In 1954, Mr. Le Vier became the first pilot to exceed 1,000 m.p.h when he made the maiden flight of the XF-104 Starfighter, the prototype of the popular F-104 fighter.

Mr. Le Vier admitted to ''some embarrassing facts". He said he had been involved in ''8 crashes, 58 near-crashes, 5 tailspins to ground level, 26 forced landings, 5 canopy losses, 20 pilot errors, 1 midair collision and 9 near-midair collisions.''

Such were the perils of taking 20 types of aircraft on their first test flights and hurtling through the skies at speeds exceeding 1,000 miles per hour in a career that spanned almost a half-century. Despite the calamities, he bailed out of a plane only once.


Anthony W. Le Vier died on Feb 6, 1998.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 02-18-2008, 07:30 AM   #19
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Apologies - have been away and unable to post, so some time to make up. (Abbreviated notes only for that reason)

Feb 15, 1827 - Francis Pratt



Francis Pratt was an engineer and co-founder with Amos Whitney of Pratt and Whitney, - a firm that built precision instruments. The firm, founded in 1860, manufactured machine tools, tools for the makers of sewing machines, and gun making machinery for use by the Union Army during the American Civil War. The firm became the leading exporter of machines and was renowned for their precision and reliability. The firm established the standard inch and became responsible for the standardisation of gages between America and Europe. They were famed for manufacture of guns, and were responsible for many protoypes including the Lee, the Medford, the Mauser and the Remington.

In 1925, Frederick B. Rentschler, former president of Wright Aeronautical Corporation, came to Hartford to explore the possibility of founding an aircraft engine company in the Hartford area. When he met with Clayton Burt, president of the Pratt & Whitney Company, all the ingredients for success were right there in that initial meeting – proven leadership, aircraft engine technology, facilities and capital. Rentschler and his partner, George J. Mead were enthusiastic pioneers in the development of dependable, air-cooled engines. Thus was born the The Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Company.

Pratt, himself had been president of the parent company until he retired in 1898 and died in 1902 before powered flight was recognised in America.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2008, 07:46 AM   #20
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 16, 1937 - Valentin Vasiliyevich Bondarenko



Bondarenko was A Ukrainian Lieutenant in the Soviet Air Force before becoming a Soviet Cosmonaut. He came to a fiery end.

On March 23, 1961 Bondarenko was working in a training simulator pressurized with pure oxygen. After removing some biosensors from his body Bondarenko washed his skin with an alcohol-soaked cotton ball which he carelessly threw away. The cotton ball landed on an electric hot plate which started a flash fire in the oxygen-rich atmosphere and ignited Bondarenko's suit.

A watching doctor tried to open the chamber door but this took several minutes because of the pressure difference and Bondarenko suffered third-degree burns over most of his body. Yuri Gagarin spent several hours at the hospital as "deathwatch officer" and Bondarenko died of shock eight hours after the mishap.

Bondarenko crater on the far side of the Moon is named after Valentin Vasiliyevich.
__________________



Last edited by flyingdoc; 02-18-2008 at 07:49 AM.
flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2008, 08:18 AM   #21
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

18 Feb, 1832 - Octave Chanute



Famed aviation historian that chronicled the history of pioneering aviation around the turn of the century. Most of what is recorded of the pioneering days in the USA was writen by Chanute.

Chanute was born in France but emigrated to America in childhood. He became a brilliant railroad engineer. His interest in aviation was stirred during a visit to Europe in 1872. Following his systematic engineering background, Chanute first collected all the data that he could find from flight experimenters around the world. He published this as a series of articles in The Railroad and Engineering Journal from 1891 to 1893, and collected together in Progress in Flying Machine in 1894. This was the first organised, written collection of aviation research. His collected publishings were to heavily influence the Wright Brothers.


18 feb, 1954 - John Travolta



American actor, dancer and singer. Acheived fame as sweathog, Vinnie Barbarino in the 70's sitcom "Welcome Back Kotter" before launching a successful movie career. He is also a Qantas pilot and acts as a roving international ambassador for the company. He is rated as a captain on many aircraft and owns/flies his own personal B707 (the former VH-EBT "City of Launceston") which he parks next to his house in Florida. He is also renowned for having been kicked off D.A.C. by our very own Waffle!



Feb 18, 1919 - Jack Palance



Of Ukranian descent, Palance was born Volodymir Ivanovich Palahniuk. He is famous for his toughguy acting roles in movies but he was also a pilot. As a youth, he won a football scholarship to the University of North Carolina but subsequently dropped out to become a professional boxer, fighting under the name of Jack Brazzo. He trained in WWII to become an Army Air Force bomber pilot but was badly burnt whilst still training and this ended his flying career. He won the Purple Heart, but not in military combat as is often written. He died in 2006.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2008, 07:53 PM   #22
ATP Captain
 
Eherran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Age: 53
Posts: 2,880
Eherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributor
Re: Today's Birthday...

Gerard: I can't thank you enough for this thread; concise and yet truly informative. Lincoln and Yeager back to back - enough said!! I kid you not, I got goosebumps reading both posts (true story). You've seen my library and you know how I feel about Lincoln, what you didn't know is how much I admire Yeager as well. You also didn't see my newly arrived Chuck Yeager autographed Bell X-1.
__________________
Eherran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2008, 03:30 AM   #23
RJ Captain
 
thrifty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 544
thrifty is getting startedthrifty is getting startedthrifty is getting startedthrifty is getting startedthrifty is getting startedthrifty is getting started
Re: Today's Birthday...

keep them coming Doc - with all this research when do you have time to work so that you can buy more of your custom jobs?
thrifty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2008, 07:10 AM   #24
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Glad you guys are enjoying. Emil - I now need to come visit again to see your Bell X-1!!

For today's birthday I would like to honour another obscure aviation hero and this post is dedicated to all who did not survive this infamous atrocity.


Feb 19, 1918 - Michael James Casey, RAF



Flight Lieutenant Mike Casey was one of the 50 escaped POW's murdered by the Gestapo after escaping through tunnel "Harry" from Stalag Luft III on Mar 24, 1944. In all, 76 men broke free in "the Great Escape", immortalised in film by John Burgess, but 50 were murdered in reprisals after their recapture.

Hitler ordered them all to be found and shot, but he was persuaded by Hermann Goering to reduce this number of deaths to 50; otherwise their guilt in the murder of Prisoners of War would be impossible to conceal. The deaths, without any heed to elaborative details, were each simply explained away as shot "while attemping to re-escape".

Amongst the executed were 22 British, 6 Canadians, 6 Polish, 4 Australian, 3 South Africans, 2 New Zealanders, 2 Frenchmen, 1 Lithuanian, 1 Greek, 1 Czech. There were no Americans in the camp or the escape.


Flt Lt Casey was British and was shot down in the second month of the war and was one of the earliest POW's (POW 24). He served with 57 Sqn RAF and his plane, a Blenheim I, L1141 was shot down 16-Oct-1939. After escaping through "Harry", he was recaptured near Görlitz and executed, shot in the back of the head by Lux and Sharpwinkel on Mar 31, 1944. RIP

Footnotes
Casey's CO of 57 Sqn, W/C Harry "Wings" Day DSO OBE, who was shot down 3 days earlier, was the senior British Officer in the POW camp. Day was recaptured but not executed. He subsequently escaped to freedom from another POW camp.

Gestapo Chief Dr Wilhelm Scharpwinkel was masquerading as a Lt Hagamann in the No 6 Hospital at Breslau when Frau Gerda Zembrodt, corroborated by Klaus Lonsky, saw Russian officers remove him at gunpoint. During the enquiry into the murders, the Russians refused to co-operate with the Allied investigation, although after much prodding they allowed Scharpwinkel to make a statement, in Moscow, during August and September 1946. Soon afterwards, Scharpwinkel disappeared and although reported dead by the Russians on 17-Oct-1947, was believed to have found a high position in the Soviet administration. He is certain to have died by now.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2008, 05:52 AM   #25
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 20, 1921 - Joseph Albert "Joe" Walker



Joe Walker was an American test pilot and a USAF astronaut. Joe Walker was the first civilian to fly into space and the first person to enter space twice.

During WWII, Walker flew the P-38 Lightning and afterwards went on to a successful career as a test pilot. He flew 3 different versions of the Bell X-1 and was the first NASA pilot to fly the X-15.

In 1963, Walker made two X-15 flights beyond 100 kilometers - the FAI definition of space. These were the only powered spaceplane flights past that threshold until SpaceShipOne in 2004 and held world altitude records for a plane until then. These flights qualified him as an astronaut under both U.S. Air Force and Fédération Aéronautique Internationale rules (The USAF astronaut wings are awarded to those that exceed 80km or 50 miles).

Walker was killed tragically in 1966 during a publicity photo shoot whilst flying a tight formation in a F-104 Starfighter - his plane was thrown by the jetwash of a XB-70 Valkyrie bomber with which it collided.



20 Feb, 1908 - Grigori Yakovlevich Bakhchivangi



Bakhchivangi was a Russian test pilot who flew the world's first rocket powered plane and held the unofficial world speed record in 1943.

Born in Brinkovskya, Russia, he completed school in 1934 and entered the Air Force Scientific Research Institute. There he was trained as a test pilot, testing 65 types of Soviet military aircraft. After the start of the Second World War he flew five types of captured enemy aircraft. He then went to the front to fly combat missions, but was called back in 1942 to test the BI-1 rocket plane.

In 1940 Aleksander Yakovlevich Bereznyak conceived the idea of a small target-defence interceptor powered by a Dushkin D-1A-1100 rocket engine using kerosene and nitric acid as fuel, after being told of the engine by Aleksei Isaev. The aircraft which took shape was known as the BI (standing for Bereznyak and Isaev who were responsible for the idea and design) and was the world's first rocket powered fighter. it's first flight under power being on May 15, 1942. Bakhchivangi was at the controls.

Bakhchivangi was fatally injured on March 27, 1943 during the 7th flight of the BI-1. The aircraft experienced the previously unencountered tendency of an aircraft to pitch down in high-speed flight and the plane crashed into the ground after reaching a record speed of 800 km/hr. He was made a (posthumous) Hero of the Soviet Union.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2008, 07:57 AM   #26
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 21, 1910 - Douglas Bader




Sir Douglas Bader was born to a military family in London in 1910. He lost both legs in a pre-war flying accident but went on to become an ace in the RAF during WWII and a tireless campaigner for amputees afterwards, for which he was knighted.

Douglas Bader was an inspiration for me and for thousands of others. I was given his biography "Reach for the Sky" when I was a late teenager and to this day remain impressed with his tenacity and fighting spirit to succeed.

He wrote of the accident that claimed both his legs whilst skylarking in 1931 "Crashed slow-rolling near ground. Bad show."

Invalided out of the RAF after a very determined rehabilitation in which he proved to be still a very capable pilot (flying with prosthetic tin legs), he managed to regain his commission as a Flying Officer after outbreak of hostilities in WWII. He rose quickly through the ranks to become a Wing Commander in 1941, the result of his exceptional flying skill and aerial successes, mostly in Spitfires.

On 9 August, 1941 Bader was shot down and taken POW. At the time he was the 5th-highest scoring ace in the RAF with 22 kills. He had always maintained he went down in a mid-air collision with a Bf109 but recent research suggests he may have mistakenly been shot down by friendly fire from another Spitfire pilot who mistook him flying alone behind a group of Messerschmidts. It remains unresolved whether Bader was covering for his comrade's mistake...

When he was shot down, his right artificial leg got caught in the cockpit and it was only because the restraining straps broke that he was able to parachute to safety. He was held at Stalag Luft III but was such a thorn in the side of his German captors in his numerous attempts at escape, that he was transferred to Colditz castle until liberation.

He remained an outspoken public character but with boundless enthusiasm, forever furthering the cause of the disabled, which earned him a knighthood in 1976. He died in 1982 of a heart attack.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2008, 06:34 AM   #27
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Feb 22, 1949 - Niki Lauda



Pilot, Airline founder and three-times Formula One champion

Niki Lauda was born in Vienna to a wealthy family but did not win favour with his decision to become a motor car racer. He took out massive bank loans to further his career and was quite successful in F2 racing but his career stalled. His big break came as he was on the verge of financial ruin when a former team-mate recommended him to Enzo Ferrari and he joined the "red" team in 1974. He placed second in his first F1 race and placed 4th in the Drivers Championship in his debut year. He went on to win the championship in 1975 and seemed assured of back-to-back victories when disaster struck and he sustained life-threatening 3rd degree burns in a crash at the German Grand Prix. He recovered from a coma and finished the season, needing only to finish ahead of James Hunt in the final race in Japan to secure the double. In an act of extraordinary courage, he retired from the race because he felt the torrential rain made it unsafe.

He won the championship easily in 1977 and again in 1984 after retiring between 1978 and 1982 to start an airline business.

Lauda has a commercial pilots license and founded his own airline, Lauda Air, in 1979. He was ousted from the board in 2000 and the airline taken over by Austrian Airlines. He founded a second Vienna-based airline in 2003 called Niki. It is 24% owned by Air Berlin with the remainder owned by Lauda himself.

This incredibly brave man occasionally pilots his company's planes himself. Apart from surgery to allow his eyelids to close, he never chose to undergo surgery to hide the horrific burns he suffered to his face and head when he was trapped and engulfed in flames in his F1 car.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2008, 09:57 AM   #28
ATP Captain
 
Eherran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Age: 53
Posts: 2,880
Eherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributor
Re: Today's Birthday...

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingdoc View Post
Feb 22, 1949 - Niki Lauda



Pilot, Airline founder and three-times Formula One champion

Niki Lauda was born in Vienna to a wealthy family but did not win favour with his decision to become a motor car racer. He took out massive bank loans to further his career and was quite successful in F2 racing but his career stalled. His big break came as he was on the verge of financial ruin when a former team-mate recommended him to Enzo Ferrari and he joined the "red" team in 1974. He placed second in his first F1 race and placed 4th in the Drivers Championship in his debut year. He went on to win the championship in 1975 and seemed assured of back-to-back victories when disaster struck and he sustained life-threatening 3rd degree burns in a crash at the German Grand Prix. He recovered from a coma and finished the season, needing only to finish ahead of James Hunt in the final race in Japan to secure the double. In an act of extraordinary courage, he retired from the race because he felt the torrential rain made it unsafe.

He won the championship easily in 1977 and again in 1984 after retiring between 1978 and 1982 to start an airline business.

Lauda has a commercial pilots license and founded his own airline, Lauda Air, in 1979. He was ousted from the board in 2000 and the airline taken over by Austrian Airlines. He founded a second Vienna-based airline in 2003 called Niki. It is 24% owned by Air Berlin with the remainder owned by Lauda himself.

This incredibly brave man occasionally pilots his company's planes himself. Apart from surgery to allow his eyelids to close, he never chose to undergo surgery to hide the horrific burns he suffered to his face and head when he was trapped and engulfed in flames in his F1 car.
Doc - you have a way to stir a man's soul. You have just released a torrent of memories and emotions. Niki Lauda was one of my racing heroes (we're talking posters, magazines, pictures, etc.) and I vividly remember crying after that horrific crash and thinking he would die and never race again. Niki Lauda - a racer's racer and a man's man!
__________________
Eherran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 08:26 AM   #29
Operations Director
 
flyingdoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Age: 56
Posts: 6,673
flyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dogflyingdoc is a top dog
Re: Today's Birthday...

Today, a woman's woman...

Feb 23, 1901 - Ruth Rowland Nichols



Ruth Rowland Nichols - perhaps the most notable aviatrix of all time. She took her first flight at age 18 as a high school graduation present and by 1923 had become the first woman licensed in a flying boat. She went on to fly every type of aircraft developed.

She was rated in the dirigible, glider, autogiro, landplane, seaplane, amphibian, monoplanes, biplanes, tri-planes, twin and four engine transports and supersonic jets.

She was the first woman to earn the Air Transport Pilot rating in 1927 and the only woman to simultaneously hold 3 world records (altitude, speed and distance 1931-2).
Nichols became the first woman pilot of a commercial passenger airline in 1932, flying for New York and New England Airways.

Nichols attempted to fly the Atlantic, but crashed in Newfoundland, seriously injuring her back. This injury proved yet another challenge for Nichols, and she flew for most of her remaining life with a steel back brace. Her injury gave her an idea to organize the Relief Wings, a flying ambulance for mercy missions.

During WWII she served as a nurse and flight instructor and was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Civil Air Patrol. She also went on to become director of Fairchild Aviation Corporation and set speed and altitude records again in 1958. In 1959 she performed well in training to become an astronaut in the Mercury program, but women were black-balled by the USAF. This led to a depression and apparent suicide in 1960.


Feb 23, 1915 - Paul W. Tibbetts Jr.

Paul Tibbetts achieved fame as the pilot of the Enola Gay - the B-29 that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.



Tibbetts interest in aviation began as a 12-year-old when he was taken for a plane ride by a barnstormer in Florida. He went to the University of Florida in Gainesville to study medicine (Go Gators!) but decided his heart was in aviation instead. He joined the Army Air Corps, graduating first in his class. He went on to fly bombers and flew B-17's when the US joined WWII. In 1943 he transferred to Boeings B-29 Superfortress plant to train pilots in flying the new bomber.

He was subsequently chosen for the top-secret atomic bomb project and led the sqadron of B-29's from the Marianas islands. His plane was simply called number 82 until August 1945 when he decided to name it after his devoted mother, Enola Gay Tibbetts. The first atomic bomb was unloaded from the USS indianapolis (which was sunk by a japanese submarine only 4 days later!) - the bomb being bigger than any that the aircrew had ever seen and more powerful than the conventional bomb load of 2,000 Superfortresses.

On Aug 6, 1945 FatBoy was dropped on Hiroshima with devastating effect. When a second A-bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan surrendered unconditionally. Tibbetts retired as a Brigadier General and died last year. He was cremated.
__________________


flyingdoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2008, 02:18 PM   #30
ATP Captain
 
Eherran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Age: 53
Posts: 2,880
Eherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributorEherran is a good contributor
Re: Today's Birthday...

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingdoc View Post
Today, a woman's woman...

Feb 23, 1901 - Ruth Rowland Nichols



Ruth Rowland Nichols - perhaps the most notable aviatrix of all time. She took her first flight at age 18 as a high school graduation present and by 1923 had become the first woman licensed in a flying boat. She went on to fly every type of aircraft developed.

She was rated in the dirigible, glider, autogiro, landplane, seaplane, amphibian, monoplanes, biplanes, tri-planes, twin and four engine transports and supersonic jets.

She was the first woman to earn the Air Transport Pilot rating in 1927 and the only woman to simultaneously hold 3 world records (altitude, speed and distance 1931-2).
Nichols became the first woman pilot of a commercial passenger airline in 1932, flying for New York and New England Airways.

Nichols attempted to fly the Atlantic, but crashed in Newfoundland, seriously injuring her back. This injury proved yet another challenge for Nichols, and she flew for most of her remaining life with a steel back brace. Her injury gave her an idea to organize the Relief Wings, a flying ambulance for mercy missions.

During WWII she served as a nurse and flight instructor and was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Civil Air Patrol. She also went on to become director of Fairchild Aviation Corporation and set speed and altitude records again in 1958. In 1959 she performed well in training to become an astronaut in the Mercury program, but women were black-balled by the USAF. This led to a depression and apparent suicide in 1960.


Feb 23, 1915 - Paul W. Tibbetts Jr.

Paul Tibbetts achieved fame as the pilot of the Enola Gay - the B-29 that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.



Tibbetts interest in aviation began as a 12-year-old when he was taken for a plane ride by a barnstormer in Florida. He went to the University of Florida in Gainesville to study medicine (Go Gators!) but decided his heart was in aviation instead. He joined the Army Air Corps, graduating first in his class. He went on to fly bombers and flew B-17's when the US joined WWII. In 1943 he transferred to Boeings B-29 Superfortress plant to train pilots in flying the new bomber.

He was subsequently chosen for the top-secret atomic bomb project and led the sqadron of B-29's from the Marianas islands. His plane was simply called number 82 until August 1945 when he decided to name it after his devoted mother, Enola Gay Tibbetts. The first atomic bomb was unloaded from the USS indianapolis (which was sunk by a japanese submarine only 4 days later!) - the bomb being bigger than any that the aircrew had ever seen and more powerful than the conventional bomb load of 2,000 Superfortresses.

On Aug 6, 1945 FatBoy was dropped on Hiroshima with devastating effect. When a second A-bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan surrendered unconditionally. Tibbetts retired as a Brigadier General and died last year. He was cremated.
Great stuff as usual! I live in Florida and oddly enough, I had no idea Tibbetts had a Florida collection, let alone a UF connection. Did you learn this while at UF or while researching Tibbetts later on?
__________________
Eherran is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:41 AM.

Latest Threads
- by kev747
 

Models of the Week
 


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

 

SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2